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The Banshee Series (Books 1-6)

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by | Nov 22, 2019 | Indie Audiobooks, Indie Book Reviews, Indie Reviews | 0 comments
The Banshee Series is a unique concept that succeeds well in most of its aspirations but fails to finish strong. As the title suggests, the story’s leading character, Benton, is a Banshee. While the oddity the hero being a banshee is what initially caught my attention, it was the author’s use of the Native American setting that really made it stand apart from other supernatural horrors.
Author Sara Clancy weaves a complex tale of the supernatural that ranges from ghosts to serial killers and of course, banshees. Full of teenage angst masked by the supernatural aspect of the story, the tale is nevertheless, enjoyable for adults. The horror elements are interesting and appropriate, never straying from PG-13, but I for one, don’t mind this in the least. If you prefer substance of slaughter, Sara Clancy certainly does well in this area.
The first book was strong enough to hook me for the series, and despite a few weak transitions between some of the titles, it kept me interested until the end. The plot is relatively complex with the standard twists and turns though nothing ever “blew me away,” nor was anything very unpredictable (with a few minor exceptions). That being said, Sara Clancy kept things interesting and unique until the end. Of note, the Native American setting proved to be quite interesting and, in many ways, was more memorable than the “Banshee” concept, something that felt under-developed.
The various supernatural enemies proved to be of interesting origins and there in lays one of the more unique and well-designed elements of the books. Sara Clancy certainly did well with this angle which helped to keep things fresh. In-fact, most of the supernatural creatures were previously unknown to me despite my years reading the genre. Sara Clancy shines in her creativity in this area.
While the overall story pacing was well-done, several of the individual book endings felt rushed, especially the grand finale. It is here where the series suffered the most. Much of the build-up through the six books didn’t feel concluded when all was said and done. What can be taken from this is both good and bad; Sara did an excellent job creating anticipation for the ending but failed to deliver a big bang. The finale isn’t bad, in-fact, it is unique and interesting, but it felt as though it happened too quickly and with too little drama.
Benton, our dark hero, is a teenager struggling to cope with bizarre dreams and parents who don’t understand him. Nicole, our heroine, is a bubbly and bright teenager who befriends Benton and serves well as a counterweight to his dreary and forlorn demeanor. In practice, the dynamic between the pair works well in the novels but ultimately fails to reach its full potential before the end of the series.  I sincerely felt this aspect of the series was going to end differently and I think most readers will find themselves rooting for an outcome that simply fails to materialize in the end.
The supporting cast in the series varies from awkward to great. Benton’s parents are on the awkward end of things. The antagonistic role Bertrand is meant to fill ends up feeling very awkward at times, absent at others, and in the end, you really don’t know what to think of them. Nicole’s parents, on the other hand, proved to be interesting and well-built, I only wish Nicole’s Father would have appeared earlier in the series as the dynamic between him and the rest of the cast added something that was missing from the earlier books. The remaining characters fill their roles well-enough, though none are very memorable.
Sara Clancy’s writing style is comfortable and well-balanced. Few readers would be able to differentiate her narrative from that of any mainstream author published by a big house. She succeeds the most in her character development and the unique subject matter of the world she built. Aside from the occasional repetition of words, the entire series is professionally written and edited.
The original subject matter and setting created a memorable experience that will allow the Banshee Series to stand out in my memory. Unfortunately, the disappointment of the relationship between Benton and Nicole shares in equal parts with the Series’ strengths. Notwithstanding this disappointment, I would still recommend the Banshee Series to any fans of supernatural horror that values an interesting story over gore. There is enough unique here to warrant sticking it out to the sixth book, and frankly, given the ending, let’s hope Sara Clancy writes a follow-up series that wraps-up Benton and Nicole’s relationship.
Jake Urry does a respectable job with his narration, though he took a little bit to get comfortable with. I had no major complaints with Mr. Urry, but he didn’t stand-out either. Sometimes, though, that is for the better. Regardless, he did a professional job that didn’t detract from the story as much as he didn’t add to it.
 
When Benton dreams, people die…
Benton Bertrand is a banshee, cursed with the ability to sense death. Every time he sleeps, he becomes a trapped passenger within a murderer’s skin: able to hear, see, and feel every part of their kill. No matter how hard he tries, it always ends the same way – with death.
This collection contains all six books from Sara Clancy’s best-selling Banshee series:
Midnight Screams: After ten years of constantly relocating, Benton’s family decides to settle in Fort Wayward, Alberta. But things change when he discovers why death follows him, why monsters draw close, and why he always wakes up screaming…Whispering Graves: Benton’s world unravels again when he encounters a new monster that kills by whispering its victim’s name. He needs to save the residents of Fort Wayward while preventing this evil from whispering him straight to his grave.
Shattered Dreams: Benton travels to a sleep center, in a desperate attempt to organize his thoughts. But a violent storm of demonic forces forms, with its eyes set on Fort Wayward. Benton needs to warn the unsuspecting town before demons claim every single soul.
Rotting Souls: Recovering from their last ordeal, Benton and Nicole discover that ghosts from their past are stalking a young girl. As they struggle to save the girl’s life, Nicole confronts her lack of remorse for having been responsible for the death of one of the vengeful spirits.
Weeping Moon: Benton and Nicole travel to the Fort Wayward tribal festival to seek help regarding his terrifying abilities. They soon discover a monster that uses the cries of an infant to lure its victim. And amid this horror, another devastating nightmare looms.
Death Veil: A vicious spirit attacks Benton’s family, and they flee to the Siksika reservation for protection. Here, they are forced to face the past to keep evil from permanently crossing over to the land of the living.
Summary The Banshee Series is a unique concept that succeeds well in most of its aspirations but fails to finish strong. As the title suggests, the story’s leading character, Benton, is a …
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Reader and writer of Horror, Sci-Fi, True Crime, and Fantasy. I’ve been a freelance book reviewer since 2017.
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A Lovecraftian twist on the monster in the woods trope, The Twisted Ones by T. Kingfisher took appreciated deviations from the typical formula, enough
Brutal, blunt, and certainly not for everyone, Haxfuri takes the Dark Fantasy genre to a depth of darkness which a true fan of the genre will certainl

Headers L.A. Fiore M.R. James Menu Layouts N.J.M. Hemfrey Post Layout Sara Clancy T. Kingfisher
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Haxfuri

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by | Aug 8, 2020 | Indie Book Reviews, Indie Reviews | 0 comments
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Brutal, blunt, and certainly not for everyone, Haxfuri takes the Dark Fantasy genre to a depth of darkness which a true fan of the genre will certainly appreciate but will figuratively and literally scare most other away.
Our story follows the classic concept of an anti-hero, himself an alter-ego of a more mild-mannered Lord. If you are thinking the central concept follows that of many Marvel heroes, you aren’t far off the mark. However, this is where the standard tropes and associations end. Enter the darkness.
Batman tropes aside, the hero of our tale is a mild-mannered and emotionally scarred Lord who traverses his city in the guise of Haxfuri. Within this form, we explore the bleak horrors of humanity underneath a thinly veiled commentary on the injustices committed against women in our own world, both past and present.
While exploring the depravity of man, Hemphrey is at his best. Beneath the dark veneer of Haxfuri is an exploration of the ugliness of man in sharp contrast to the beauty of those soles willing to stand as a beacon in the perpetual night of analagous human history.
Philosophy aside, N.J.M. Hemphrey weilds his words well, generating a well-crafted text that does little to distract from the story. As I’ve seen more and more, Hemphrey demonstrates the talents so frequently overlooked by traditional publishers, albeit Haxfuri’s dark content would be hard-pressed to find a mainstream audience, thought this is certainly not a reflection of the quality of his text.
I have mixed feelings as a reviewer in this case. At its core, Haxfuri is an investigation into the depravity of man compounded with the will of those willing to face it. Certainly, those with a taste for dark fantasy will be at home here. For the rest, it will be hard to recommend this work. In the end, I fully-recommend a purchase if this genre fits your mold, if not, you will likely be quickly overwhelmed by the darkness found here.
From the Publisher
Enter the dark city of Skrimgool. A war-weary Lord fights injustice as his ultra-violent alter-ego, Haxfuri. Alas, he and his closest companions fail to save the sheriff’s daughter from a crazed cult’s vicious ritual – a cult that should have been dead. In the months after, the effects of the ritual linger and a dreadful, tarry plague consumes the land and threatens every creature within it with malignant malformation.
Witch-hunting and heretic-burning run rife as the religious patriarchy turns increasingly fanatical to enforce order and female subservience. Haxfuri descends into potion-doped insanity, desperate to prevent the horrors of the sheriff’s bloodthirst. The wilder Haxfuri fights, though, the worse he fears the rising darkness inside him and the monstrous voice through which it speaks.
A holy, unsparing holocaust is coming to cleanse Skrimgool city and if Haxfuri can’t bring himself to stop it, he’ll find that the nightmare is only beginning. . .
Brutal, blunt, and certainly not for everyone, Haxfuri takes the Dark Fantasy genre to a depth of darkness which a true fan of the genre will certainly appreciate but will figuratively and …
Reader and writer of Horror, Sci-Fi, True Crime, and Fantasy. I’ve been a freelance book reviewer since 2017.
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A Lovecraftian twist on the monster in the woods trope, The Twisted Ones by T. Kingfisher took appreciated deviations from the typical formula, enough
Brutal, blunt, and certainly not for everyone, Haxfuri takes the Dark Fantasy genre to a depth of darkness which a true fan of the genre will certainl
  The Ivy Blackwood Chronicles was a memorable adventure that sold me on the possibilities of erotic romance being a legitimate storytelling medi
Headers L.A. Fiore M.R. James Menu Layouts N.J.M. Hemfrey Post Layout Sara Clancy T. Kingfisher
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The Twisted Ones

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by | Oct 15, 2021 | Traditional Audiobook Reviews, Traditional Book Reviews, Traditional Reviews | 0 comments
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A Lovecraftian twist on the monster in the woods trope, The Twisted Ones by T. Kingfisher took appreciated deviations from the typical formula, enough so to keep my interest in what is normally an overdone genre.
Intro
In certain overused subsets of the horror and Supernatural genres, I rarely invest in a full-length novel these days. While I’m known to listen to hundreds, if not thousands, of Creepy Pastas, this tends to be the extent of my investment. In a moment of, ‘I’ll try this out because nothing better is on my radar,’ I gave The Twisted Ones a chance. Even then, I nearly put it down several times during the opening stages, yet the interesting inner-dialogue of the heroine combined with the oddity of the ‘cleaning up the dead hoarder’s house in the woods’ was enough to keep me going until the real twists began. Here in lays the power of T. Kingfisher’s story; the inner monologue and attachment to the main character was enough to drive this story forward and keep me coming back to discover her fate.
World
Set in the woods of rural North Carolina, the story focuses heavily on this sleepy backwoods aspect. However, given the inferences and characterization of the residents of this town, I feel like the author would have done better to center it in West Virginia, if nothing more than for the strong association with the sort of backwoods she was going for. In fact, I actually thought that’s where it took place until I went back and re-read the description. I guess my point is that while the setting served the story well, if you are going with an overdone trope, keep the story where you expect it. In hindsight, North Carolina proves to be an odd choice, though admittedly, she is probably near to the mark in real life.
Plot
Initially, the story told here felt very cliche, saved only by the inner-diaglogue of our heroine. Here The Twisted Ones actually excells as Kingfisher builds a broken family narrative which is as intriguing as it is enjoyable. The twists and turns along this vein will surprise most and certainly the best feature of this novel, especially when it turns Lovecraftian.
Initially, the “Skinwalker” angle is fairly unremarkable though I must give credit to the well done descriptions of said monsters. Now, I must pause here a moment to conceed that Kingfisher never explicitly calls these creatures “Skinwalkers” but this was clearly, at least to me, the inference. That being said, these monsters are the visibile enemy throughout the story, and while remaining so until the end, never produce a strong, well-defined villian. On paper, I suppose they technically do, but something was certainly missing from them at the end.
Many of the other things expected with this sort of setting and cast are found as you would predict; small backwoods town, creepy house in the woods, etc. Here the plot varies little from the normal formula, only taking a turn in the latter half of the novel when seemingly out of the blue, Kingfisher injects a Lovecraftian spin to the story. I’m certainly not complaining here, this was one of the best aspects of the plot, yet it feels unpolished in the end and while the final showdown was action-filled and somewhat satisfying, the book ends somewhat hurriedly, almost as if the author was uncertain how to put the finishing touches on it.
Characters
Character design was hit and miss. “Mouse,” the nickname of our lead, is well-crafted, relatable, and truly the star of this show. If it wasn’t for her strong character development, I would have put this book down after a few chapters. That being said, you have a lot of stereotypes filling the supporting cast. There is the well-meaning Sheriff’s Deputy, the local coffee shop oddball friend, and the mysterious African American who is in-tune with the local lore and mysticism. In this regard, Kingfisher failed to keep things fresh. While I enjoyed these characters, they definitely felt like something you’d get from an amateur offering, not a mainstream published work. Further compounding this, with the exception of the voodoo-esque neighbor, none of the other characters were developed enough for me to care about them. The cast is truly the weakest part of this offering.
Mechanics
As you would expect from mainstream publication, the literary mechanics are well-done yet unremarkable. Here in lays the problem with corporate publishing; in the drive to be technically proper, I think both authors and publishers alike loose focus on what truly makes a novel great; the story. Kingfisher would have been better served by an Editor who pushed her to re-invent and innovate rater than focusing on polished mechanics. It’s truly a double-edged sword for the author as they must focus so much on the quality of the text that I believe they miss out on, or do not have enough time to fix the little things that held back this particular novel from achieving loftier goals.
Overall Impression
In The Twisted Ones, Kingfisher partially succeeds in her effort to create a unique world from an overused modern horror concept. Essentially, she takes the popular “Skinwalker” niche and wraps around it an ancient semi-human race with a Lovecraftian flare. I say she partially succeeds simply because it felt like she could have, and should have, fleshed this concept out a bit more. Granted, when you attempt to emulate Lovecraft, the bar is pretty high and with that in mind, the author made an admirable effort which translated into a unique blend to the old Native American monster-in-the-forest tale. I will make one note here and offer praise for her description of the Skinwalkers and the original spin, albeit via Lovecraft, she put on this trope. Suffice it to say, it was definitely memorable.
In the end, T. Kingfisher succeeded in creating a main character who was engaging with the reader while navigating a Lovecraftian world, while falling short of fully separating her stage from present day cliches and a lukewarm cast that was mostly unremarkable. I recommend this title to any fans of the Skinwalker mythos as well as avid Lovecraft fans. Outside of that, I don’t see this book finding much appeal.
From the Publisher
When Mouse’s dad asks her to clean out her dead grandmother’s house, she says yes. After all, how bad could it be?
Answer: pretty bad. Grandma was a hoarder, and her house is stuffed with useless rubbish. That would be horrific enough, but there’s more—Mouse stumbles across her step-grandfather’s journal, which at first seems to be filled with nonsensical rants…until Mouse encounters some of the terrifying things he described for herself.
Alone in the woods with her dog, Mouse finds herself face to face with a series of impossible terrors—because sometimes the things that go bump in the night are real, and they’re looking for you. And if she doesn’t face them head on, she might not survive to tell the tale.
From Hugo Award–winning author Ursula Vernon, writing as T. Kingfisher.
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A Lovecraftian twist on the monster in the woods trope, The Twisted Ones by T. Kingfisher took appreciated deviations from the typical formula, enough
Brutal, blunt, and certainly not for everyone, Haxfuri takes the Dark Fantasy genre to a depth of darkness which a true fan of the genre will certainl
  The Ivy Blackwood Chronicles was a memorable adventure that sold me on the possibilities of erotic romance being a legitimate storytelling medi

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Self-Publishing Tools to Get You Started

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by | Nov 25, 2021 | Indie Book Blog | 0 comments
Writing in this modern world comes with as many positives as it does negatives. On one hand, authors have more responsibility than ever before. Research, marketing, finance… there are lots of tasks to perform, skills to learn, and bridges to cross.
Conversely, there are more opportunities and tools available than at any point in history. People around the world can make a living as a writer and can utilize state-of-the-art technology in pursuit of their dreams.
That all being said, it is easy to become overwhelmed by the breadth of it all. So, to help with your journey, here are three tools to lighten your load and make life more manageable.
Has there ever been a more crucial time to research your writing?
No matter if you create online content, or write books, research can make or break your project.
There’s such an abundance of writing out there that thorough research is one of the best ways to make your work stand out, boost its credibility, and increase the value it provides to those who read it.
For writers who grew up in the age of the internet, it’s hard to imagine how tough things used to be. The opportunities are to find quality information, and make use of it in writing projects, were a lot more limited.
If you want to make the most of the blessing that is the modern research environment, here are a few tools that can help:
No matter which research tool you decide to use, always keep its purpose in mind. Don’t research for the sake of it. Make sure it will strengthen your writing and add value for your intended reader.
While it’s true that specialist writing tools aren’t essential to produce great work, they can help!
From word processors designed to meet the needs of writers just like you, through to invaluable self-editing resources, there are many helping hands available than ever before.
Here is a selection of some of the best writing tools out there, along with some tips on making them work for you.
Take the time to choose a selection of writing tools that are a good fit for your intended usage, process, and budget. Just make sure that selecting and learning tools doesn’t become a form of procrastination… tools are there to serve your writing, rather than distract from it.
Regardless of whether you love or hate the need to market your work, it’s undeniably true.
The level of marketing required changes from writer to writer. Freelance content creators might need to maintain an impressive profile on a site such as Upwork, for example. Self-published authors might need to envision and execute a complex marketing plan.
No matter the type of marketing you need to carry out, there is a useful tool out there for you. Here are a few of the best.
For a lot of writers, marketing is a pain point, for others it’s an interesting and useful field to get immersed in. No matter which side of the divide you fall on, using the right tools will make your marketing a lot more efficient and effective.
If you have the luxury of time, use it to find the right combination of writing tools for you. Experiment and find a combination that benefits your process and provides an enjoyable experience.
Alternatively, reach out to your writer network. Ask a writer you admire what their process and toolkit looks like, and copy it or yourself. You can always make adjustments along the way.
As stressful as the modern writing world can be, it also has a lot of blessings. Seek them and make your writing life that little bit easier.
Summary The Banshee Series is a unique concept that succeeds well in most of its aspirations but fails to finish strong. As the title suggests, the st
Summary Fresh off the brilliant Audible rendition of the classic M.R. James tales that is The Conception of Terror, I decided to delve into some of hi
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by | November 23, 2021 | Indie Book Blog | 0 Comments
…there are a number of pros and cons to self-publishing. With that being said, self-publishing may be the best option for you. If you truly believe that you have a book that will sell, you are encouraged to closely examine self-publishing, as you have nothing to lose by doing so.
by | November 23, 2021 | Indie Book Blog | 0 Comments
…there are a number of pros and cons to self-publishing. With that being said, self-publishing may be the best option for you. If you truly believe that you have a book that will sell, you are encouraged to closely examine self-publishing, as you have nothing to lose by doing so.
Classic Fiction Horror M.R. James Post Layout Sara Clancy Supernatural
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Is Self-Publishing Right for Me?

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by | Nov 23, 2021 | Indie Book Blog | 0 comments
Before examining if self-publishing your own book is right for you, it is first important to familiarize yourself with self-publishing, namely what it is. Self-publishing involves writing, developing, and selling a book without the assistance of a third-party publishing company. Book authors are responsible for writing a book, editing a book, and finding a company to print the book, as well as selling the book. Self-published authors typically sell their books on their own websites, or they approach retailers, both on and offline.
As for whether self-publishing a book is the right option for you, there are some signs that you will want to look for. A few signs that self-publishing may be your best option are highlighted below for your convenience.
Sign #1 – You Have Received Multiple Rejection Letters
What it is first important to understand about the publishing process is that few authors receive offers from publishers on their first, second, or even third try. In fact, some authors try fifty times or more to get just one book published before they receive an offer.
As a good rule to set for yourself, be sure to send your manuscript to as many publishers as you can, especially those that are looking for what you have, such as an environmentally themed children’s book or a science fiction novel. When there are no more publishers left, consider self-publishing.
Sign #2 – Despite Rejection Letters You Still Believe You Have a Good Book
Self-publishing is a wise choice for many, but for others, it can be a costly mistake. Before deciding to go ahead with self-publishing a book, it is important to make sure that you are fully behind your book. Do you honestly and truly believe in your heart that you have a good book on your hands? If you do, self-publishing may be for you.
Sign #3 – You Have a Book with Limited Readers
When many of us think of publishing a book, we automatically think of captivating stories. Fiction books are not the only types of books written, although they do typically have the largest audiences. If you have authored a how-to book or a guide on a specific area that is likely to only draw in a few readers, self-publishing may be your best option. Many well-known publishers stay away from books that only have small target audiences.
Sign #4 – You Want to Retain the Largest Profit
Self-published authors stand the best chance of making the biggest profit. This is because they do not take publishing fees out of their profits. With that said, it is important to remember that self-publishing is not free. You will have to pay to have your books developed in print, but that fee is typically smaller than the cut that many well-known publishers take. There are always ways that you can save money with self-publishing, like by printing on demand, as opposed to a large quantity of books on hand.
Of course, it is important to remember that just because you want to make money; it doesn’t mean that you will. If you want to make the most money with a self-published book, you have to do the proper amount of marketing.
It is important to remember that there are several pros and cons to self-publishing. With that being said, self-publishing may be the best option for you. If you truly believe that you have a book that will sell, I encouraged you to closely examine self-publishing, as you have nothing to lose by doing so.
Ready to get your book on the market? We recommend Aarden Press, an indie publishing co-op, to help get your book to market.
I've been a rebel writer and indie book afficianado since I was exposed to Medium in High School. More than 10 years later and I'm still buried in more indie books than I know what to do with… and I love every moment!
Summary The Banshee Series is a unique concept that succeeds well in most of its aspirations but fails to finish strong. As the title suggests, the st
Summary Fresh off the brilliant Audible rendition of the classic M.R. James tales that is The Conception of Terror, I decided to delve into some of hi
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by | November 25, 2021 | Indie Book Blog | 0 Comments
Writing in this modern world comes with as many positives as it does negatives. On one hand, authors have more responsibility than ever before. Research, marketing, finance… there are lots of tasks to perform, skills to learn, and bridges to cross.
by | November 25, 2021 | Indie Book Blog | 0 Comments
Writing in this modern world comes with as many positives as it does negatives. On one hand, authors have more responsibility than ever before. Research, marketing, finance… there are lots of tasks to perform, skills to learn, and bridges to cross.
Classic Fiction Horror M.R. James Post Layout Sara Clancy Supernatural
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